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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Lets start with : I LOVE THIS BIKE!!! I have no intention of buying a 6, 750 , 10 . I got this ex in 2 cardboard boxes and just all-out enjoyed the entire rebuild/restore, starting with the $150 total payment. I'd rather save the boring and injection mods for after i blow up this motor, as i have had to do little on its end. The farthest i've torn into it was removing and JB'ing the W/P cover. Carbs were a different story. Stage 1 dyno installed(have stage3 jets for later date), full back muzzy, K&N high flow. I can't find a taylored turbo kit for a 500 ninja to save my life. "It's not worth it!" Well, it is to me. So save those posts. This is like making the Shelby out of the Miata. If you have to ask, forget it. After riding it stock for a year, then carbed for 2, I am ready for more. I'd prefer a kit that could interchange with a few mods to the next size motor I swap to after this 500 fireballs. I'll weigh options for that one when I see that bridge. Most likely just a 600, i've seen a bunch of those for sale off layed down zx6's i'm certain can be fab'ed. I'm not even thinking about used turbos, just to save that reman headache. Beside, I have limited knowledge of them to start. But, I jetted it without a Dyno, so im cocky in thinking i can manage. Especially if i can get it as a ready, set kit with instructions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Reading that, maybe i should be more clear - I'm looking for info on a pre-existing all inclusive turbocharger kit for a 93 ex-500a7. Or, one designed for a later year model, say Ninja 600. If they simply dont exist, is there a spec limit database i could consult in order to amass my own turbo system. The whole bike's been altered, down to the rear fatty and swing arm to match, so patchwork mods arent out of the question. Drivability issues are dealt with on this thing daily. Most are corrected simply with my ride style, or by changin certain habits. Its so light, i pretty much force it to hold online every time i lay a knee out. I think thats why i love it so much. Anyway, thanks for your time spent on me in advance. I know im long winded.
 

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Well, I have some experince from turbo cars and my brother have stuck a turbo to his old ford.
I think you will have a hard time finding a finished kit, the alternatives is probably to pay a mecanic who has experience with turvo conversions to do it OR to do it yourself. The first option will be very expensive.
The second one could be quite cheap if you by used parts.

You need a exhaust manifold that puts the turbo charger high enough to be able to evacuate the oil. If it is lower than the oil level the turbo will fill up with oil.
You need hoses for the oil and the watercooling for the turbo.
You need a watercooler if the bike is oil-cooled.
You need a used turbo in good condition, a small turbo from a car will do the trick. Too big turbo will make the bike difficult to ride because of the long spool up time.
You need a plenum chamber to supply all carbs with air.
You might need to rebuild the carbs so that they will work when feed with boost pressure.
You should consider using a intercooler to avoid knocking or pre-ignition.

It is absolutely doable, and if you do the work yourself and buy a used turbo the cost might be anything between 200-600 $.

My tips is to search for turbo-bike projects and if you like reading I´ll suggest Forced induction performance tuning by Graham Bell.

Good luck!
 

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I'm not aware of a kit for that bike.

While it's possible to turbo many different bikes, the key is to start from the bottom up and build an engine to take the extra power.

With most of the modern bikes, you have to modify the internals of the engine to make this work. Rods, oil pump, different pistons and more depending on the bike. I run a heavily modified turbocharged Z1 punched out to 1200cc - internally much had to be changed.

"Motorcycle Turbocharging, Supercharging, & Nitrous Oxide: A Complete Guide to Forced Induction and its use on Modern Motorcycle Engines" (Paperback) by Joe Haile is a decent read to give you a grounding in turbochargers. It's not really a how-to guide, but it helped me understand more about turbochargers.
 

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Here, Graham Bell was the telephone dude, Corky Bell wrote the book, and not everyone agrees with what he says. :)

While double checking to make sure I was correct, and there wasn't someone named Graham Corky Bell, I ran across his website.

Bell Experimental Group - BEGi
Well, at our level I think everyone can appriciate the book. I suppose that the disagreement is in the details and we don´t need to know eveything to make a working turbo kit.
If we start to push the limit and squeeze every bit of hp out of the engine then we must carefully examine everything.

@Jeff:

I don´t agree that a total rebuild of the engine is necessary if we only want some extra horsepower.
Bigger oilcooler might be a good idea, also to monitor the oilpressure and make sure that the engine doesn´t run lean.
On a car a cheap "knock" detector can be made by attaching a "brake-pipe" to the engine and run it through the firewall and attach a tin can to it. All preignition and knocking will be heard in the car. Might be difficult on a bike though.

Often over reving puts more stress on the conrods. Knocking and pre-ignition is disastrous for the bearing and the pistons so make sure that the bike doesn´t run lean.

Of course the wear will be more than normal but it is so expensive to build an engine with special conrods and pistons so it is cheaper to try with the original engine and swap it if you wreck it.

I know of a old ford sierra with a 2,8 v6 original 150 hp and he attached a turbo and another fuel injection system he measured 340 hp at the rear wheels. Even the clutch is stock.

So if the topic starter "only" adds 25-40 % hp he should be okay, for a while.
But I don´t know the weak points on this bike, it might turn in to a fireball at the first start up.
 

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Well, at our level I think everyone can appriciate the book. I suppose that the disagreement is in the details and we don´t need to know eveything to make a working turbo kit.
If we start to push the limit and squeeze every bit of hp out of the engine then we must carefully examine everything.

@Jeff:

I don´t agree that a total rebuild of the engine is necessary if we only want some extra horsepower.
Bigger oilcooler might be a good idea, also to monitor the oilpressure and make sure that the engine doesn´t run lean.
On a car a cheap "knock" detector can be made by attaching a "brake-pipe" to the engine and run it through the firewall and attach a tin can to it. All preignition and knocking will be heard in the car. Might be difficult on a bike though.

Often over reving puts more stress on the conrods. Knocking and pre-ignition is disastrous for the bearing and the pistons so make sure that the bike doesn´t run lean.

Of course the wear will be more than normal but it is so expensive to build an engine with special conrods and pistons so it is cheaper to try with the original engine and swap it if you wreck it.

I know of a old ford sierra with a 2,8 v6 original 150 hp and he attached a turbo and another fuel injection system he measured 340 hp at the rear wheels. Even the clutch is stock.

So if the topic starter "only" adds 25-40 % hp he should be okay, for a while.
But I don´t know the weak points on this bike, it might turn in to a fireball at the first start up.
Karl, I don't disagree that you can leave some engines stock - however, most of the modern motorcycle engines are engineered near the limit of their strength. This is how they keep the weight down, and produce all the power they do. Over-engineering engines (like Kawasaki did with the Z1) are a thing of the past.

A turbo running around 6-8lbs of boost will give a street bike a very nice power boost - roughly a 30%-40% increase in power depending on the engine and turbo setup.

How the turbo is lubricated is key. Many turbos take oil feeds from the engine - and if the engine oil pump is weak, this can cause major problems. External electric pumps can be used. Or you can select a turbo with a self-contained oil system.

Adding an oil cooler on some turbo bikes can be problematic - they cause the oil pump to work harder, and effectively reduce oil pressure to the engine and the turbo.

I have no experience with turbocharging watercooled engines - so I can only guess you might need to modify the water pump setup as with a turbo, as the engine WILL run much hotter.

For a small engine like the EX500, you would need a VERY small turbo unit - it's important to match the turbo to the amount of air flowing thru the engine at peak rpm - books like Joe Haile's help explain all of this.

As a very rough guide, if you could find a turbo on a 1,000cc car engine that only revved to 5,000rpm max, you would have a turbo that would be close to the size you'd need on a EX500 that can rev to 10,000rpm. The issue is most turbo'd small car engines rev to much more than 5,000rpm - so just about all the turbos fitted to cars would be too big for that motor.
 

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Karl, I don't disagree that you can leave some engines stock - however, most of the modern motorcycle engines are engineered near the limit of their strength. This is how they keep the weight down, and produce all the power they do. Over-engineering engines (like Kawasaki did with the Z1) are a thing of the past.

A turbo running around 6-8lbs of boost will give a street bike a very nice power boost - roughly a 30%-40% increase in power depending on the engine and turbo setup.

How the turbo is lubricated is key. Many turbos take oil feeds from the engine - and if the engine oil pump is weak, this can cause major problems. External electric pumps can be used. Or you can select a turbo with a self-contained oil system.

Adding an oil cooler on some turbo bikes can be problematic - they cause the oil pump to work harder, and effectively reduce oil pressure to the engine and the turbo.

I have no experience with turbocharging watercooled engines - so I can only guess you might need to modify the water pump setup as with a turbo, as the engine WILL run much hotter.

For a small engine like the EX500, you would need a VERY small turbo unit - it's important to match the turbo to the amount of air flowing thru the engine at peak rpm - books like Joe Haile's help explain all of this.

As a very rough guide, if you could find a turbo on a 1,000cc car engine that only revved to 5,000rpm max, you would have a turbo that would be close to the size you'd need on a EX500 that can rev to 10,000rpm. The issue is most turbo'd small car engines rev to much more than 5,000rpm - so just about all the turbos fitted to cars would be too big for that motor.
Hi Jeff! You are obviously more experience than me when it comes to bikes, I´m used to cars. If you think there could be a problem with oil pressure I believe you. That could be sorted by using an external oil system for the turbo as you said.
I would be looking for a turbo from a small diesel engine, for example daihatsu charade 1 litre turbo diesel. Or try to get the smallest exhaust turbin (don´t know the english name) from a volvo 940 turbo.

And as you pointed out modern bikes are already pushed to the limit more or less but the ex500 is from 1993 so the hp/litre might not be to high. I don´t know the compression ratio which is important. I realised that it is a twin and that might be an issue, I don´t know how this affects the spool up time for the turbo.

I think the TP starter should go ahead and try to build a turbo kit if he realises that it will cost three times as much as he believes when he starts and there is a good chance that something could go wrong. If cheap and reliable horsepower is wanted, another bike is probably the cheapest solution.
But if you enjoy the project and are willing to spend time and money the outcome could be great. And you will learn alot.

/Karl
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
excellent references fellas. and it turns out to be in the 2-600 range even. might have to shell out for the weld work, but it seems possible. manifold looks to be the largest headache. thanks
 
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