Kawasaki Motorcycle Forums banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Read Only
Joined
·
255 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here are two lighting questions for UK brothers and sisters ...

1. When the motor is running are the front indicators normally on in a low power mode as forward facing low glow running lights and are the lenses colored yellow/orange?

2. Does the headlight dip straight up and down in a symmetrical manner or dip to the left?

Thanks
 

·
Read Only
Joined
·
255 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks very much Vulcanolic. Do you or anyone else know if:

1. Front indicators being permanently lit up in a low power daylight running mode is legal in the UK? I'm wondering if any bikes in the UK do that.
2. Front headlight not having an "E" mark on the glass is legal in the UK? Mine dips symmetrically up and down. It also has PIAA bulbs but that's an easy fix if not legal.
3. Any other gotchyas importing US (California) spec bikes to the UK?

After many fabulous years working in the US we're looking at a job transfer back to the UK.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
134 Posts
I think the indicators have to be turned off, only to be displayed when turning.
Don't worry about the headlight, the "E" is a European trademark for safety standard. More important with helmets then, for instance, a headlight.

Don't quote me on this but I think that the rear indicators are ok in amber, but not in red or white.
There has to be a distinction between the rear light, brake light and indicators.

In all though mate, these are easy to fix and cheap.
 

·
Read Only
Joined
·
255 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I think the indicators have to be turned off, only to be displayed when turning.
Don't worry about the headlight, the "E" is a European trademark for safety standard. More important with helmets then, for instance, a headlight.

Don't quote me on this but I think that the rear indicators are ok in amber, but not in red or white.
There has to be a distinction between the rear light, brake light and indicators.

In all though mate, these are easy to fix and cheap.
Thanks for the info Vulcanolic.

Fixing the indicators should not be rocket science. In the ideal world it would be as simple as a bulb change but that's probably too easy!

Is the lens for the the rear light and brake light a different color on your UK bike then? Mine is red all over.

My rear indicators are amber so no problem there.
 

·
Politicians' Nightmare
Joined
·
1,871 Posts
A few years ago when we moved to the UK I brought along my Calif/American spec. Yamaha 650. No problem getting it licenced in the UK - DVLC people were only interested in the date of manufacture and the serial number, and the MOT inspection "Pass" certificate. They also took my Calif. title pink slip.
 

·
Read Only
Joined
·
255 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
A few years ago when we moved to the UK I brought along my Calif/American spec. Yamaha 650. No problem getting it licenced in the UK - DVLC people were only interested in the date of manufacture and the serial number, and the MOT inspection "Pass" certificate. They also took my Calif. title pink slip.
That's good to know. How did you get the bike to the MOT station and did you still have your CA US plates on it or were they removed at export?

I'm supposing that the bikes get through customs and then I'll need to get them MOT tested and DVLC approved for use on the UK roads. How to get them insured while riding them to the MOT and any DVLC inspection locations?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
134 Posts
Thanks for the info Vulcanolic.

Fixing the indicators should not be rocket science. In the ideal world it would be as simple as a bulb change but that's probably too easy!

Is the lens for the the rear light and brake light a different color on your UK bike then? Mine is red all over.

My rear indicators are amber so no problem there.
No mate, the brake light and normal rear light is also red all over.
So no problems there then .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,606 Posts
Is the lens for the the rear light and brake light a different color on your UK bike then? Mine is red all over.

my lenses are clear all round, but the bulbs are coloured.
originally the turn signals had an orange lense and the tail/brake light had a red lens, but i swapped them for clear lenses and orange/red bulbs as appropriate.

turn signals (indicators) must light amber/orange.
brake and tail light must light red.

i'm pretty sure that the turn signals being used as running lights is illegal.
 

·
Read Only
Joined
·
255 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Getting Ready to Permanently Import to UK from US

In case it might help others here are the key points that I've found out in my investigations on the Web and a phone conversation with a very helpful UK government department regarding importing bikes from the US to the UK. So far I've found the whole process very accommodating with just a little help needed to understand a couple of points.

1. Silencers/mufflers must be indelibly marked with the motorcycle manufacturers brand name (e.g. Kawasaki, etc.).

2. Tyres/Tires with DOT mark are acceptable but the speed and weight rating must be marked. Apparently some tires bear the DOT mark but don't display this information.

3. As discussed on this thread, the front running lights must be disabled.

4. A flat horizontal beam that dips straight up and down is acceptable.

5. A "front position lamp" sometimes referred to as a city light is mandatory. They were very hot on this (no pun intended). It can be hard wired ~ 4W/5W bulb inside the headlamp and need not be switched. It can also be a single external centrally placed lamp or two symmetrical lamps.

6. Since inspection is not voluntary, the motorcycles can be ridden to the government inspection station but the US plates should be removed first. Temporary short term insurance can be arranged using the VIN number.

There's a lot of information on the relevant UK government Web sites that a few Web searches will pull up but it was the last two items in particular that vexed me.

This is not intended to be an official guide so the usual disclaimers apply but I thought I'd pass it on as I can't believe that I'm the only person doing this :)
 

·
Politicians' Nightmare
Joined
·
1,871 Posts
That's good to know. How did you get the bike to the MOT station and did you still have your CA US plates on it or were they removed at export?

I'm supposing that the bikes get through customs and then I'll need to get them MOT tested and DVLC approved for use on the UK roads. How to get them insured while riding them to the MOT and any DVLC inspection locations?
Sorry to be slow answering - have been away. I left my CA plates on the bike when I took it to the U.K. and I rode it to the MOT inspection station with the CA plates still on. No problem with the bike at U.K. Customs, but don't have either any firearms or any alcohol of any sort in the shipping container - we did and had declared them on the bill of lading, but Customs held our stuff at the port of entry for weeks, and the port began to charge storage. I finally appealed directly to the Customs office in Swansea and the very kind lady inspector saw to it that the container was transported to our home and Customs inspected each item as it was unloaded, taking custody of my shotgun until I could get a Swansea police permit and charging us tax on the few bottles of wine we had in the shipping container. They did not charge any tariff on my Yamaha. After the MOT garage had inspected my bike and said that my rear drum brake needed new shoes (they mis-assembled my front wheel by failing to re-engage the speedometer drive dogs properly, putting the speedo out of action until I could figure out how they had messed up and repair it), I rode the bike with the CA plates still on it to the DVLC office where they examined the bike and took my CA pink slip and the CA licence plate, and gave me the U.K. registration papers which I then had to take to an auto supply shop where I had to pay for the U.K. number plate, which arrived in a week or so. The bike's lighting already had E-numbers from the factory in Japan. If the lighting had not had E-numbers DVLC would have made me change the lights - it probably would have not passed the MOT with non-E-number lighting. I got U.K. insurance from Foremost before riding the bike - no problem even though I didn't have a U.K. driver licence yet. But since I didn't have a U. K. licence the insurance cost was fairly pricey. The biggest hassle was getting a U.K. motorcycle driver licence!

Good luck with your move - I hope that it goes more smoothly than ours did! But the motorcycle part was relatively painless apart from the MOT garage having messed up my speedometer drive.
 

·
Read Only
Joined
·
255 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I've been so busy that I did not have time to update this thread earlier. In case anyone else every wants to do this, the bikes have been imported and are now in use in the UK. Quite a few forms to complete but by no means impossible and no doubt it would be quicker after the first learning experience. The Motorcycle Single Vehicle Approval (MSVA) test was very thorough but my previous post or 11-26-2009 turned out to be an accurate summary of the key points. Disclaimer, YMMV though!

The only thing that was a slight surprise is that even though the bikes were less than three years old the still had to have an additional test for the MOT which was nonsense since the MSVA test was far more thorough. The rational is that anything registered in year yyyy is assumed to have been manufactured on 1/01/yyyy so in my case, automatically exceeded the three year MOT trigger date.

An 'E' stamp or not on the headlight was indeed irrelevant. Exhaust noise and pollution levels are checked but no problems with my standard CA specification bikes. In fact he commented that the exhaust emissions were super low.

Tip-1. If the key to the steering lock is different to the ignition (e.g. Triumph Bonneville) then do take the steering lock key with you as that's a part of the MSVA test. You can guess how I know that.

Tip-2. Any accessories, including those sold by the manufacturer may be a issue as everything on the bike must have a 2mm radius to all edges. A guy with an imported super low mileage ex police sheriff Harley failed his MSVA test as the screen did not comply. Apparently BMW and I've no doubt others have the same issue. However, it's quick fix - just remove the screen, His Harley also failed because he'd not disconnected the front blinkers from being running lights but that was also easy.

Tip-3. Everyone was very helpful and friendly but allow some time for this. Especially with everything else going on, it's not something you can expect to get done in your first week.

Full credit to Mrs. BikerEm for doing all the great work on this :)
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top