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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I feel stupid asking this question because I am fairly mechanical around bikes and cars. I just changed the coolant in my V2K and can't see how to check the level in the overflow tank. It looks like opaque black plastic to me that you can't see coolant in. What am I missing here????
 

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There is a tube in an absolutely insane place. I think this is a picture I tried to take once. I can't even makes heads or tails of this picture. :lol:



You have to look inbetween the mufflers, and then the tube needs to be clean enough to see through.

Herb
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
So you observe the coolant in the tube, but use the level markers on the resevoir. You don't see the coolant IN the resevoir itself.
 

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So you observe the coolant in the tube, but use the level markers on the resevoir. You don't see the coolant IN the resevoir itself.
Hey, there isn't a window for checking the oil. :p I ain't knocking the V2K. I love the engine & transmition. I wished it were the base for the Voyager. I could get rid of the Vision & Goldwing if that were the case.

Herb
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I guess its about time for me to change my coolant..since mine is a 2004 too. I hate the thought..tell me how difficult it is to change.
T.O.
It's an easy job. You don't have to remove the tank....just prop the side up with a 2x4. It took some looking to find the proper drain bolt and checking the level is easy once you know where to look. Pour new fluid in as slowly as you can to evacuate as much air as possible.
 

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It's an easy job. You don't have to remove the tank....just prop the side up with a 2x4. It took some looking to find the proper drain bolt and checking the level is easy once you know where to look. Pour new fluid in as slowly as you can to evacuate as much air as possible.
Yoy WILL have to remove the tank, to put in the coolant and get air out of the system.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yoy WILL have to remove the tank, to put in the coolant and get air out of the system.
You WIL NOT have to remove the tank. I just did 3 V2Ks last week. All you need is a proper funnel and the tank propped up from the side. (with the single rear bolt out)
 

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Periodic Maintenance Procedures
•Loosen the air bleeder bolt [A] on the thermostat housing.
Front •Replenish the coolant into the radiator until the coolant
begins to flow out the air bleeder bolt hole (that is, all the
remaining air is forced out). •Tap the radiator hoses to force any air bubbles caught inside.
•Fill the radiator up to the filler neck [A] with coolant. •Install the radiator cap. •Tighten the air bleeder bolt .
Torque - Thermostat Air Bleeder Bolt: 7.8 N·m (0.80 kgf·m,
69 in·lb)
•Fill the reserve tank up to the “F” (full) level line [A] with
coolant and install the cap (in the photo, the muffler has
been removed for clarity). •Install the fuel tank (see Fuel System chapter). •Start the engine and warm it up thoroughly until the radiator
fan turns on and then stop the engine. •Check the coolant level in the reserve tank several times
while the engine is cooling down, and replenish as necessary.
If the coolant level is lower than the “L” level line , add
coolant to the “F” level line.
CAUTION
Do not add more coolant above the “F” level line.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
So just by pouring in the new coolant will evacuate the air or will you have to bleed it through the drain until all air is out?
T.O.
I filled it slowly with the bleeder open. I tapped and squeezed various coolant hoses to get air to move upward. After running the engine, I re-checked for air and felt it was good.
 

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Thanks for the tip about propping up the tank to get at the fill spout. I need to change the coolant also so will give that a try.
 

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Remember to flush it first with radiator flush and then put the new stuff in. the flush chemical gets out all the crap in your cooling system. Its not a hard task just takes some time. I just did mine yesterday it took about an hour or so. Just because flushing the system takes the longest.
 

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Remember to flush it first with radiator flush and then put the new stuff in. the flush chemical gets out all the crap in your cooling system. Its not a hard task just takes some time. I just did mine yesterday it took about an hour or so. Just because flushing the system takes the longest.
Unless you have an old bike that you have let set around for a long time it probably is not necessary to do that...just my opinion. If there is a little crud in there it will come out when you drain it. My bike is an '04 and antifreeze will last quite a while if you don't have high mileage. Pretty cold here...lol.
 
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