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At some time today, and every day, pause for just a moment to give thanks to all the Veterans who have served, and lift a word up to the Great Motorcyclist In The Sky for those who gave their all at Ft. Hood, and for the families, too.
Larry
U.S. Army
1968-1971
 

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My father is a vet. I was going to go into the army myself, but my skinny body didn't weigh enough. I tried everything to put on the few pounds I was short, but no dice. It worked out better career-wise for me, but I genuinely was intending to join up. At the time I would have been in, I probably wouldn't have seen any actual action, though.

My father has a similar weight issue. His solution was to fill up on bananas and water that morning, hoping that would tip the scales just that bit extra.

I actually tried the same trick, but unfortunately, it backfired: they did the test for diabetes and all the sugar in the bananas triggered a positive result. So, I had to sit around and wait for it all to metabolize so they could test me again. 6 hours later, I had to weigh in again, but ended up short because the bananas and water were long gone and they didn't let me eat anything else.

So, back home I go on the Shortline bus and with the option that they can re-weigh me in 3 months and not have to retake the physical if I weigh enough. I'm only short 3 pounds, so I only have to gain 1 pound a month.

So, the sergeant puts me on a regimen of weight gainer shakes, weight lifting and all kinds of carbs. Three months later, I go back and I'm told I'm still too light. Even more, I weighed exactly the same, to the ounce. My body simply adapted to it all.

The funny thing is, I've always been healthy, can standing lift over 3/4 of my body weight and probably would have gained those pounds once I got in. My dad told me he gained 5 pounds in just a few months scarfing down SOS and some of the other stuff they served.

So, while I didn't get in, my dad served. He was in Germany during the Cuban Missile Crisis and when Kennedy was assassinated. Needless to say, those were some tense times. He wasn't in the trenches or anything (he worked in the Commandant's office), but he went in voluntarily. He could have easily gotten out of it if he wanted just by not working to gain the weight he needed.

His father served, too, and actually saw action in WWII - and he volunteered, as well.

Of course, now days, there's no draft so you don't have to serve if you don't want to. Yet plenty do. I just wonder how many people really appreciate that fact.
 

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IBA#34418
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My father is a vet. I was going to go into the army myself, but my skinny body didn't weigh enough.
Funny you should say that. I made it by 3 lbs over the low limit. Gained 15lbs in boot camp.

Of course, now days, there's no draft so you don't have to serve if you don't want to. Yet plenty do. I just wonder how many people really appreciate that fact.

I am just glad people are learning to appreciate their military. You don't have to love the war, but love your soldier.
 

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I am just glad people are learning to appreciate their military. You don't have to love the war, but love your soldier.
I gained far more than I ever gave during my service 1976-1980. I salute the many who have given, are giving and will give much more.
Amen to Both. Would do it again in a heart beat. Thanks to all
 
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