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Discussion Starter #1
Hi
Long time owner and lurker but first time poster.

I’m dismantling my chopped/bobber 95’ VN800A for a full facelift but have run into a potential issue and hoped a member might be able to advise.

I’ve removed the rear swing arm and shock without issue but am having problems with the “shaft swing arm” OEM 33032 that supports the lower shock mount. The nut is loosened off and the bolt turns freely but despite a few sharp taps I’m getting nowhere winding it out.

I know it has the bushings and seals but all the other rear suspension parts are simply knock through. Before I take a bigger mallet to it can anyone confirm I’m on the right track? The manual I have and online pdfs seem to cover everything but.......

Thanks in advance
42790
 

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I'm guessing the Shaft has welded itself with Rust, Time & Road Salt to the Needle Rollers inside the Bearings (Arrowed) so although the shaft rotates on them it won't move when you give it a nudge, So a bigger nudge is required making sure not to damage the threads along the way..

 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks so much for the prompt response GREENISBEST, that’s excellent news! I can bring the larger rubber mallet into the game - sacrificing the internals is no issue on this project but I’ll certainly be reusing the shaft.

It’s drowning in lube overnight so tomorrow should see dismantling complete 👍🏼

42791
 

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You may have to introduce a Copper Mallet to the Shaft, A Rubber one might not have enough impact.
 

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Agree with Greenisbest. I recently performed a similar job on my KLR650. What happened in my case is that rust had formed along the entire inside portion of the shaft making it extremely difficult to move the shaft out of its bearings.

Thread the nut onto the shaft leaving it shy by one or two threads. Then get your biggest brass, or bronze hammer and start pounding on the nut. If you have to, use a steel hammer. Nuts are cheap so if you destroy it, no big deal. It helps to spray some really good penetrating oil into the hole before you thread the nut on.

Once it starts to move, at some point you will have to remove the nut and take over with a nice long drift and keep pounding away. Keep oiling and pounding.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Agree with Greenisbest. I recently performed a similar job on my KLR650. What happened in my case is that rust had formed along the entire inside portion of the shaft making it extremely difficult to move the shaft out of its bearings.

Thread the nut onto the shaft leaving it shy by one or two threads. Then get your biggest brass, or bronze hammer and start pounding on the nut. If you have to, use a steel hammer. Nuts are cheap so if you destroy it, no big deal. It helps to spray some really good penetrating oil into the hole before you thread the nut on.

Once it starts to move, at some point you will have to remove the nut and take over with a nice long drift and keep pounding away. Keep oiling and pounding.
Thanks WFO-KZ. Just welded up a double nut with stub so I can give it some welly without chewing the threads up.

Hopefully an oil soak and double nuts will let me “crack” it with no adverse consequences. Always some unexpected hiccup on older bikes, probably never been out since the factory 👍🏼
 

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Good idea Andy.

I ended up making a custom round drift that had a hole on the end that was just big enough to slip over the threads and small enough to clear the hole in the frame. The hole was deep enough to allow the drift to contact the shoulder on the shaft I was trying to remove. With that drift I could keep pounding until the shaft was all the way out. But it looks like you don't have a shoulder on the shaft so without a shoulder this won't work.

When that ordeal was done I drilled and tapped two grease fittings into my swingarm so this would never happen again.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Good idea Andy.

I ended up making a custom round drift that had a hole on the end that was just big enough to slip over the threads and small enough to clear the hole in the frame. The hole was deep enough to allow the drift to contact the shoulder on the shaft I was trying to remove. With that drift I could keep pounding until the shaft was all the way out. But it looks like you don't have a shoulder on the shaft so without a shoulder this won't work.

When that ordeal was done I drilled and tapped two grease fittings into my swingarm so this would never happen again.
That’s a plan. Got a couple of M6 nipples coming overnight from Amazon....... great advice, thanks again!
 

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Glad to help. Here is a picture of the KLR laid on her side. This allowed gravity to assist in flowing the oil and it also made swinging the hammer a lot easier.

42792
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Still no joy, despite an overnight soak on its side 🤔 the bolt now turns freely, so I’m guessing the needle rollers have jammed tight. Next step is a judicious waft of heat and failing that I think I’ll have to put it in the press.

Quite keen to paint it myself, having only ever done a few jobs before so got a stack of carbide discs waiting to attack the crusty bits of the frame, but really want it stripped properly first.
 

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What are you using for penetrating oil? I applied the oil from both sides... copious amounts sprayed on and left to soak overnight and then resprayed and soaked again. Each time I would pound on it. It took several days before I got it to move. I used Deep Creep by Seafoam. That stuff is amazing. With the bike laid on its side, I was able to build a pool of Deep Creep all around the shaft and then I would rapidly and lightly tap the shaft to set up vibrations to help migrate the oil to where it needs to go.

Heating it might work, but you have a tube inside a tube, so you won't be able to apply the heat directly to the tube that is a tight fit on the shaft with a rust bond. So the heat has to be passed through an air gap. Not good but it might work.

I guess I don't understand how your bike is configured but on mine you could not remove the swingarm until the shaft was removed. You indicated that you had the swingarm removed which is great. How are you supporting the swingarm while you wail away at it with BFH?
 

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Discussion Starter #13
The fact it took you a few days is reassuring - I’d expected the penetrating oil to do its thing overnight which is usually the case.

On the VN800A the swing arm itself has a shaft with a secondary shaft - and the one I’m struggling with - mounted at the very bottom of the frame with the sole purpose of supporting the lower shock bracket.

The swingarm shaft popped out after a few squirts and a teasing tap while the bike was in a semi assembled state. Now I’m down to bare bones and can flip the frame upside down and inside out to reach all the oiling points and hammering angles I’m stumped!

I did get some acid - phosphoric iirc without checking - that cleaned years of fuel crud and rust from a tank, so am eyeing up a syringe and the lube holes if this doesn’t free up in a few days.
 

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Think the trouble is (if I've got the right bolt) as @GREENISBEST says that the bolt has joined with the collar inside the rocker arm , and your trying to knock the bearing out with it, any chance you can set up a press arrangement and start to push the bolt out, maybe a Heath Robinson bearing puller set-up but with the puller pushing rather than pulling, just my 2 penny worth:whistle:
 

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I think I may be at odds with what component is being discussed :unsure:
When you mention 33032 I assumed you meant the Bolt from the Swing Arm Cradle but having had a read through again I see you did say Shock Bolt which is also 33032, My Bad.
With this now cleared up in my head I would apply some heat to the Shock Linkage and spray with penetrating oil, Repeating the process a few times will get the oil into the Needle Rollers that are the Likely suspect for you pain.
Remember to pull the heat away (Flame) BEFORE applying the penetrating oil as most are partially flammable, It's not unusual to see a few puffs of flame applying the oil as the component will be hot.
Bare in mind that is Aluminum so don't go made with the heat as this material gives little or no warning it's about to deform.
Having said that you may already have done this so ignore me ;)

 

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I also went down the same 33032 rabbit hole. It is confusing, 33032-1177 and 33032-1176 are both identified as SHAFT, SWING ARM. Ok, while I still believe the issue is as Ropp says that the shaft has bonded to the collar (or sleeve) with rust, that detail is somewhat moot.

What is interesting is that the collar in this case is much shorter and should be easier to get oil to flow into that rusted space between shaft and collar, if that indeed is the problem.

Given that we are now dealing with aluminum, I would agree with Greenisbest, that heat will work. If nothing else it will expand the bearing bores to the extent that they allow the shaft, collar and bearings to come out as an assembly.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I’m very grateful for the continued interest and suggestions. I probably didn’t explain clearly in the first place - and the OEM part duplication muddied things further.

42799

it’s the shaft that supports the shock’s lower bracket so it’s technically not “the” swingarm though it’s consistently referred to as such by Kawasaki.

currently enjoying an extended soak - there are several holes in the frame which I assume are for lubing and I’ve got it loose enough to turn but not budge laterally.

as you’ve identified I’m fairly sure it’s salt/rust/age seized so the next step is gentle heat. Failing that I can access commercial vehicle presses/pullers through work so hopefully I’ll get there!
 

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Nice! A picture is always worth a thousand words. If it is properly supported, it should press out easily. I wish I had had that option with my swing arm battle.

If you use heat you will destroy the rubber seals, and likely harm the needle bearings. Maybe you need to replace those anyway. In my instance, once I freed the shaft from the swing arm, I was able to salvage all components including the seals and bearings because the only issue was rust between the sleeve and the shaft. I cleaned up the shaft and sleeve with my lathe and some emery cloth. With the addition of grease fittings this will never be a problem in the future.

In my case, Kawi provided a drain hole to allow water out, but it also allows water in. With grease fittings I keep the entire housing full of grease so water cannot get in in the first place and even if it does, the metal parts are all surrounded and coated with waterproof grease.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Well that didn’t go to plan 😳 Lubing, tapping, gentle heat etc, etc all proved fruitless.

So into the press, no movement. Apply heat, apply more heat and some pressure together.....
And ooops, like a snake swallowing a mouse if you’ve watched Attenborough- the outer casing corrugated dramatically as the needle bearings swelled it up.

So time to weld some additional supports to keep the frame square and cut the lower section out. Fabricate a new outer and try to source a replacement shaft - bit more thank intended!

oooops 😂
 
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