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New guy here looking for a little help. I tried using the search function and I didn't really find the answers I was looking for. I just picked up my first bike and it needs a few things. When I am riding the bike goes into gear smooth but when you let the clutch out, and get on the throttle the bike kind of pops and it feels like the clutch is slipping? It will do it in every gear. If I am really easy on the throttle it won't do it. The guy I bought it from said something about the clutch springs? But I dont know that much about bikes. The other this is the rear brake needs to be tightened a little. Is there a DIY on that or is it pretty straight froward? Thanks in advance
 

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The 800's clutch springs are pretty weak. Order some +15/+20% springs should take care of any slippage.
You'll need a service manual, but the clutch isn't terribly difficult to get at.
 

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Not sure what the popping is about, as slipping is usually the sensation I think of when I encounter a bad clutch. Are rpms rising without a corresponding rise in bike speed?

Replacing springs can be one remedy for a slipping clutch. Sometimes they do get weak, which reduces the pressure on the plates when the clutch lever is released, causing a slip. If too much slipping has been going on for a long time, it can wear the plates and cause them to need replacing also. Normally when I take the bike apart to do this, I just replace everything. Get some prices for springs, as well as plates and fibers and judge for yourself what you want to invest. Keep in mind that you'll also need a new side cover gasket. Also consider that when you replace the springs only, and the clutch still slips, you'll have to do the whole job over again to put in new plates & fibers.

I'm going to assume the bike has a drum-style rear brake. There should be an adjusting nut located on the brake rod, at the wheel end of the rod. Tighten it a few turns at a time until you reach a good level of braking power, but not so much that you cause the brakes to drag when they're released. (This is how my drum brakes were adjusted...yours could be different). If your rear brake has an external wear indicator (usually a needle pointing at a range graph), see where it's pointing when you press firmly on the brake pedal. If the needle exceeds the limit of the graph, you need new brake shoes.

Good luck!
 

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Black Permatex for the gasket. Set of springs should cost $15-$20, and you'll need the 'O' seals for the coolant tube or it will leak.
 
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