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Upshifting:
1st > 2nd -- 12 mph
2nd > 3rd -- 15 mph
3rd > 4th -- 19 mph
4th > 5th -- 21 mph
5th > 6th -- 28 mph

Downshifting:
6th > 5th -- 15 mph
5th > 4th -- 12 mph
4th > 3rd -- 9 mph
3rd > 2nd -- 9 mph
2nd > 1st -- 9 mph

What on earth is is talking about? It says these are the speeds to be at when up/down shifting. Is this saying accelerate to 12 mph then shift to 2nd, accelerate 15 more mph and shift to 3rd etc? Not seeing how that logic works for the downshifting though. Anyone care to clarify this for me? Thanks.
 

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If you don't have a brand-spankin'-new bike then ignore it. I believe what you're looking at is the recommended shift points in actual indicated mph during the factory recommended break-in period, usually the first 600 or 1000 miles following a new purchase. It means from a dead stop accel to 12 mph in 1st, shift to 2nd. Accel to 15 mph, shift to 3rd. Etc. on up (or down) the line. Do a search of this forum and you'll find many differing opinions of this and other recommended procedures for breaking in an engine.
 

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Upshifting:
1st > 2nd -- 12 mph
2nd > 3rd -- 15 mph
3rd > 4th -- 19 mph
4th > 5th -- 21 mph
5th > 6th -- 28 mph

Downshifting:
6th > 5th -- 15 mph
5th > 4th -- 12 mph
4th > 3rd -- 9 mph
3rd > 2nd -- 9 mph
2nd > 1st -- 9 mph

What on earth is is talking about? It says these are the speeds to be at when up/down shifting. Is this saying accelerate to 12 mph then shift to 2nd, accelerate 15 more mph and shift to 3rd etc? Not seeing how that logic works for the downshifting though. Anyone care to clarify this for me? Thanks.
If you don't have a brand-spankin'-new bike then ignore it. I believe what you're looking at is the recommended shift points in actual indicated mph during the factory recommended break-in period, usually the first 600 or 1000 miles following a new purchase. It means from a dead stop accel to 12 mph in 1st, shift to 2nd. Accel to 15 mph, shift to 3rd. Etc. on up (or down) the line. Do a search of this forum and you'll find many differing opinions of this and other recommended procedures for breaking in an engine.
Here's how I take it (and I'm likely wrong, but what the heck):

These are the maximum speeds at which you should shift up or down at to keep the bike below the recommended RPMs:

Upshifting:
1st > 2nd -- 12 mph
2nd > 3rd -- +15 mph = 27 mph
3rd > 4th -- +19 mph = 46 mph
4th > 5th -- +21 mph = 61 mph
5th > 6th -- +28 mph = 89 mph

Downshifting:
6th > 5th -- -15 mph (assuming a 55 mph speed limit) = 40mph
5th > 4th -- -12 mph = 28 mph
4th > 3rd -- -9 mph = 19 mph
3rd > 2nd -- -9 mph = 10 mph
2nd > 1st -- -9 mph = 1 mph

If the first set works only off the first speed at each level, it looks like this to obtain a recommended speed:

Upshifting:
1st > 2nd -- 12 mph
2nd > 3rd -- +15 mph (from 12)= 27 mph
3rd > 4th -- +19 mph (from 12)= 31 mph
4th > 5th -- +21 mph (from 12)= 33 mph
5th > 6th -- +28 mph (from 12)= 40 mph

...which seems to conservative to me, but could also be right if you're trying to keep it under 3-4K.
 

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just cruzin by!
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1,398 Posts
just ride it like normal but dont bog it down any.They just cover there ars with these figures that way they can blame it on over revving if something happens to the engine.We plug a computer into the outboards to check the "breakin" of the engine after someone brings the boat back for service.It tells the date,time,rpms and hours on the engine.Also tells how long the rpm's were sustained. We have found several boats that went past the break in rpm.Most high performance engines we sell have a label on the cowling that states sustained rpm's over manufactures specifications will void warranty.
 
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