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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys I've been riding a 2009 Ninja 250 and I think I have already outgrown it. Its a shame cuz I really put a lot of extras into it. Anywayz I'm going to keep it for the rest of the summer but when I get back from my military stuff next Spring I was hoping to trade it in for a faster bike. My choices are either between a 600 or a 1000. I think I'm a really good rider and you can probably tell I'm confident. The first time I actually ever rode my 250 on the road I took it on my highway and did 75. Just trying to choose between the two and would like some advice. Thanks


This is my bike v
 

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Ride a 600 for awhile before you throw a leg over a 1000. No matter how confident you are, it pays to get some experience before you make that jump. Remember, a 250 puts down ~30HP. A 600 is around 100 HP and handles much differently than a 250. A 1000 puts down ~150 HP and handling is different still.

My advice, look for a nice used 600 and learn to ride the h3ll out of it, and then start thinking about whether you want or need a 1000.
 

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Yes, you come across confident, which means you're overconfident. It's easy to get complacent when the worst that can happen when you twist the throttle is the wind noise gets a little louder. I'm with bennice, spend some time on a 600 class machine before you move to the big boys. Who knows, you may find yourself plenty comfortable there for a good long while. I'll never forget the feeling of the first time I was on my ZX-6R. And I came from a Ninja 500.
 

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when the chicken strips gone on your tire trade up to the 600 when that strips gone trade up untill you can ride that bike to its full potential you havent outgrown it its easy to get bored with a bike if you just want to go fast but learning how to control the bike takes time
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the advice guys, I might get a 600 instead. It all really depends on next years lineup I guess. Looks + Power mean the most to me. So I'll just have to wait until 2010 to know for sure.
 

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There's a difference between feeling confident and being confident in your abilities. 7k on a 250 is well...7k miles. How do you know when you're ready to move up? This is part of the list that convinced me that I was ready when I had my 500R:

  • Never shifting below 9k on-the-tach in every gear to take full advantage of the engine's power curve (that doesn't mean racing the bike in traffic, that means using the power)
  • Cruising at 7k on-the-tach to take advantage of engine braking in 40+ mph traffic
  • Engine braking making the front end dip two inches while riding on the freeway
  • Taking turns posted 25 mph at 55 mph in the twisties and having my much more experienced friend telling me that the front end suspension is max'd out
  • No chicken strips
  • The bike wasn't meeting my needs performance-wise for riding in Los Angeles/Orange County traffic (not even talking about the twisties here)
I never tracked the 500R so I know that there's a whole world of skill that I never tapped into--but I never intended to hit the track when I started riding. If you can honestly say yes to all of those few items I listed, then you're ready to move up to any bike that you want--no exceptions. That means that you can upgrade to a litre bike (like I did) or even a ZX-14 if that's the bike of your dreams.

I don't know why people think that you need to transition up the ladder (i.e. 600, 750, litre and bigger). If you take your time developing your skills on your first, your second bike can be any bike that you want. Do it this way and you can save yourself a lot of money by avoiding mid-size bikes for two or three years if your end goal is a litre bike or bigger. Hell, I went from a 50 hp, carburated twin to a 123 hp, FI in-line4 bike with absolutely no difficulties. In fact, the first thought when I twisted the throttle on the Z1000 was, "...this is the way riding is supposed to be...".

When you're truly ready to move up, you won't be thinking that you're ready, you'll know that you are and you'll know exactly what bike you want and more importantly, you'll know why you want that bike.
 

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'09 Vulcan 900 Custom
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definitely agree with Eidan's line of thinking here. I don't necessarily think the question is size once you step up to a 600 or bigger. I know that lap times on 600s can rival the liter bikes easily. Every bike is different and every rider likes something different. If you are confident that you can ride a faster bike, anything over the 500 can get you into just as much trouble just about as quick.

In all reality, you might even look at the 14. The 6r is FAST and you can carry corner speeds and do track days all day long. I had a 10r last year and can tell you that it is a totally different machine but it was more comfortable to me and my style of riding than the 6. For my frame and size, the 14 probably would have been a better choice. It has less aggressive styling and plenty of ponies. I didn't like the looks of it as much or probably would have given it more thought.

Be sure to consider your riding style, wants and reasons for them (more power might be more than you need or maybe not, but make sure it isn't the only reason you like the bike you like) And consider comfort and feel. I think when I get back to stocking my stable with another sporty, I might look for an older 11, 12 or maybe even a 14. You may decide you like the size, feel, and power of a new 600 better. Just make sure it is something you like rather than something that impresses other people......
 

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I'm just curious,

4 weeks ago you were asking what bike to get as your first bike,

3 weeks ago you posted about your new Bike,

You say you Will Have 7000+ miles, but what have you actually done?

3 weeks and you have outgrown your first bike, even with the super dooper fancy exhaust that gives you 30% more power.

18, overconfident, 3 weeks experience, ummm I really don't know what to say except, Keep the shiny side up.
 

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you just started riding...you havent outgrown the bike. you just think you have. just because its not as "fast" as you want it to be doesnt mean youve outgrown it. i bet its abilities are still well beyond your own. going fast in a straight line is one thing, but going fast in turns is what is really impressive. i cant go fast in turns, but thats not really that important to me anyways. i just enjoy riding.

a 1000 will be way too much for you and id bet a lot of money on you getting hurt really quick. a 600 might still be too much for you with the way you are thinking. but thats just my opinion. do as you will, but i wouldnt go any bigger than a 600, unless it was a Ninja 650.
 

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Hey guys I've been riding a 2009 Ninja 250 and I think I have already outgrown it. Its a shame cuz I really put a lot of extras into it. Anywayz I'm going to keep it for the rest of the summer but when I get back from my military stuff next Spring I was hoping to trade it in for a faster bike. My choices are either between a 600 or a 1000. I think I'm a really good rider and you can probably tell I'm confident. The first time I actually ever rode my 250 on the road I took it on my highway and did 75. Just trying to choose between the two and would like some advice. Thanks


This is my bike v
On that note, here's my story right about the same time "I think I'm a really good rider".

On this forum we hear about a lot of accidents, idiots in cars who don't know how to drive, motorcyclists who aren't focused on their driving, and bikers going down one way or another. It's great to hear these stories as we can learn from them and give heartfelt support to those who go down.

After reading posts and threads, one gets the impression that sooner or later it will be my turn. So I would like to know how many out there have NEVER been in an accident (though we have all had close calls). There are hundreds of thousands of bikers out there and I'm sure the majority have been riding safely and enjoyable year after year. Let's see the bright side and hear from those who have never been hit or dumped their bike! Dropping your ride is another story!
I know you wanted to hear success stories but I thought my experience may be relevant to your discussion.

This was posted on another thread:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken View Post
Re-reading my post, I sounded really preachy. Sorry about that. I was
reflecting on a friend who went down hard exactly one year ago and still
on the mend. He was in the over-confident crowd though.

Nearly every rider hits a point in the sport where they are past the
point of feeling like a complete rookie
-- they can shift effortlessly,
glide through sweepers at a reasonable rate, start off in a completely
straight line, stop gracefully, and start to spend more time enjoying
the ride than concentrating on the ride. And that's what I meant. It's
at this point where it's easy to become complacent or overconfident
.
Some may even become bored and want more out of their bike. In many
cases their wants are greater than their ability.

What they haven't done is master the basics. They don't do a couple days
each Spring in a parking lot to brush the rust off and do some figure
eights, emergency braking practice and other evasive maneuvers that are
so important. They can't do a proper u-turn on a narrow road without
wandering into the shoulder, or they duck walk the bike instead. And
then when they try to go out 2-up before mastering these techniques,
they get in trouble because the bike is suddenly 100-200 pounds
top-heavier than it was while solo.

Most of us fall in love with the sport after a short time in the saddle.
Many will go down or even perish after becoming complacent and losing
focus on the ride or, worse, becoming overconfident. You may or may not
fall into one of these categories. You know what they say, "It's not if
you'll go down, but when." Be careful out there. Do an honest self
assessment of your comfort, confidence, and skill level before bounding
off on one of the most powerful production bikes out there.

Good luck!

This is my reply:
Pretty much exactly what happened to me as well Ken. Been riding for
about a year and a half and I was everything you said above. I was
feeling pretty good about my riding and thinking I was doing well. I
practiced swerving and hard stops etc. But leaving work one day, in our
work parking lot, a car started to back out and I swerved (using
countersteering, which was good), but I locked both brakes and washed
the bike out from under me. I still think of that crash and it keeps me
honest when I start getting too confident again.

I heard someone say there's 3 states to motorcycling:
1) learning (confidence building)
2) complacency (confidence built, I'm GOOD at this)
3) crash (Start at #1)

The trick is to stay between #1 and #2, never stop learning, but don't
be scared, and don't get too cocky. You NEED to be confident to ride,
just not TOO confident.

Been riding 5 years since my crash, over a 100,000kms ridden and no more
crashes. My wife and I just completed the Advanced Rider class. Personally, I probably never would have signed up for it, but she's
been riding for 4 years now and wants to brush up her skills so I agreed
to take it with her. Probably a good thing too, I may be getting too
close to #2 again. :tongue:

From this thread...
http://www.kawasakimotorcycle.org/forum/kawasaki-cruisers/78372-does-everyone-crash-2.html#post1170599
 

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I agree in general with what eidian says. The key point is honesty with yourself. You don't come into a forum and go "as you can see I'm pretty confident so I'm going to buy a 1000". That throws up warning flags to me.

Also, moving from a 500 to a standard 1000 is a heck of a lot different from moving from a 250 to a supersport 1000. The Z1000 is 80+lbs heavier and 50hp down on most any supersport 1000. That's a WORLD of difference.

When we make suggestions we er on the side of caution and levelheadedness because everyone knows that most any rider wants the biggest baddest bike there is because as he said he's interested in "looks and power". So yeah, if you can turn off the "I wanna go fast!" Ricky Bobby mentality and honestly evaluate your skill set then I say sure go with whatever bike you feel comfortable on. But for most people the safer route is going to be stepping from a 30hp bike to a ~120hp 600 than a ~180hp 1000.
 

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Wait a minute!
You have only been riding for three weeks? And you already took the bike out and up to 75? And you think you have outgrown the motorcycle?

Just as a point of reference. I have been riding over 20 years and spent more time on sport bikes than all but a few people I know (most of them on this forum) I just spent all day on a rebel 250 this past saturday. I learned that I can get in trouble on that little bitty bike even with my years of experience. I am glad you know you are waiting another year for another bike. You may decide many things in that year of riding your 250. I would suggest keeping this thread bumped near the top the entire time, taking the constructive feedback and letting all of us know your feelings in a few more months, and then in another year or so. I would not be surprised if you still want the bigger bike, but your reasons may change drastically.

I traded my 10r in because my job was making me too high strung to be a safe rider on such a machine. With my experience, I knew my limits and the bike wasn't necessarily dangerous, but just a bad idea. Judgement can save a life and it might just be your own. Try to keep that in mind and keep us posted.

Take care,
Robert
 

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I agree in general with what eidian says. The key point is honesty with yourself. You don't come into a forum and go "as you can see I'm pretty confident so I'm going to buy a 1000". That throws up warning flags to me.

Also, moving from a 500 to a standard 1000 is a heck of a lot different from moving from a 250 to a supersport 1000. The Z1000 is 80+lbs heavier and 50hp down on most any supersport 1000. That's a WORLD of difference.

When we make suggestions we er on the side of caution and levelheadedness because everyone knows that most any rider wants the biggest baddest bike there is because as he said he's interested in "looks and power". So yeah, if you can turn off the "I wanna go fast!" Ricky Bobby mentality and honestly evaluate your skill set then I say sure go with whatever bike you feel comfortable on. But for most people the safer route is going to be stepping from a 30hp bike to a ~120hp 600 than a ~180hp 1000.
Pretty much anything over 100HP is a waste on the street anyway. Bikes with up to 100Hp will accelerate plenty fast up to 80-90MPH, after that is where the added HP over 100 kicks in, but when are you ever gonna use it?
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Yes the first time I ever rode a motorcycle on the street I did 75mph on the highway, I didn't say I outgrew the bike just because I did this. When I said I have outgrown the bike I mean that I can do all of the following

Go around 15mph turns at 45mph
Stop and start perfectly
Change lanes perfectly
Emergency stop perfectly
I ride the bike all day in the upper rpms
I only shift when the bikes at the highest power output for that gear

This is why I said I feel like I have outgrown this, all of this stuff I did on the first day I rode it. Maybe I'm just naturally good at this, Idk I am a quick learner. Not saying I'm Ben Spies but to every man is his own. I will definitely keep it all summer until I go to boot camp because I want to get more road experience but yeah I think next year I will be trading it in for a 2010 R1 and no I'm not going to give it full throttle and kill myself, I'm gonna slowly grow into it as I progress. I added some more pics by the way of my bike up top. Thanks
 

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MaNaMaNa DoDoDoDoDo
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Well, neverdie (i love the name), do what you believe is right and best for you. But, if you have been on this board for very long, which you haven't it appears, you would know these folks are probably the most knowledgeable when it comes to bikes and riding. Keep the rubber side down.
 
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