Kawasaki Motorcycle Forums banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

I own a 1995 ZX-6E with 99,400 miles. Recently, the clutch started slipping, so I replaced the plates and springs. Changing the plates helped with the slippage at lower RPMs; however, the clutch still slips badly beginning at around 6000 RPM. Also, if I let the clutch out very slowly, the bike begins to shake before it starts moving.

Well, I took out the plates again, and I made sure they were in properly (everything was torqued to spec as well). And I replaced the clutch cable. Still, the problem remains.

Does anybody have any ideas what the next step to take is? My friend tells me that I should replace the entire clutch assembly (housing, hub, plate), but to do so would be expensive. Basically, if the plates and the clutch cable are not the problem, what would be the next part you would inspect or replace? Any help or suggestions are appreciated.

Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
slipping clutch

When you replaced the clutch plates did you replace both the steel plates as well as the friction plates?
I’ve got a 1989 GPX600R (ZX600C) with 20.000 miles on the clock.
The manual states possible cause of clutch slipping.

A. Clutch release mechanism defective check the shaft, cam, actuating arm and pivot.

B. Clutch hub or housing unevenly worn. This causes improper engagement of the discs.

With that sort of mileage I would check the above
Get your hands on a Haynes Manual if you haven’t got one already
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
A couple of things spring to mind that you could check..

With the high milage of the engine it is likely that the slots in the clutch basket where the tangs of the friction plates move are worn, If this is the case then when you are actuating the clutch the plates won't move freely and smoothly in the slots causing poor clutch movement, Possible clutch slip and or judder.

Don't forget that when you replaced your friction plates you should have left them to soak in oil overnight (the same grade of oil that you intend to run the bike on) otherwise you can get problems with clutch operation.

Also when replacing the plates remember the last Friction plate to go in is offset to the rest..

Make sure that the oil you are running your bike on is either straight mineral oil or a semi synthetic...Don't use fully synthetic as you may experiance clutch slip..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thanks dudes,

Well, unfortunately, it sounds like I am going to have to replace the clutch basket, which is the most expensive of all clutch related parts ($250). I'll go to a junkyard I suppose. I'm still considering just replacing all the actuator related parts first, just to see what happens. But considering what twowheeler told me, and also considering the way the bike shakes as the clutch is released (like a Sportster), it's probably the basket.

By the way twowheeler, the last friction plate is offset, but I did not soak the friction plates overnight. I only soaked them for about 20 minutes (my friend told me that that was sufficient enough time). I will check for anything abnormal on the plates next time I take them out.

Also, I noticed what you're talking about regarding the oil and slippage. Yes, with Castrol fully-synthetic oil, slippage was much worse. Now, I'm using Golden Spectro 10W40 synthetic blend (things are definitely better). And maybe it was me, but the slippage was even less noticeable when I was using 20W50 semi-synthetic. But you know, I think some professional mechanics, particularly the ones who write for motorcycle magazines, they flat out refuse to believe that fully synthetic causes slippage. Go figure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
your clutch

i had a lot of clutch slippage probs on my 86 zx900. I ended up rebuilding the master cylinder and the slave cylinder as the clutch is hydraulically actuated. Is your's hydraulic? Also, check the little teeth that the plates slide into cuz they get little scoring on them and that can cause the plates to get stuck. Also, make sure your rod moves smoothly back and forth and isn't corroded inside. For me, the slave cylinder and master cylinder were severely corroded and clogged, so once i rebuilt it it's been smooth sailing all the way up to red now. But, I know how you feel man- i was there. U wanna rev it but you can't!
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top